Category: ww1

Dec 11 1918 “Informal portrait of 17612 …

Dec 11 1918 “Informal portrait of 17612 Sergeant A C Cripps, 4th Field Company Engineers, who represented Australia in the International Boxing Tournament, held at the Royal Albert Hall” https://t.co/e2biZCkiLe https://t.co/7GXp6oL4jo http://twitter.com/ThisDayInWWI/status/1072689808588173312

Dec 11 1918 “Informal portrait of &lsquo…

Dec 11 1918 “Informal portrait of ‘Digger’ Evans, who represented Australia in the Bantam Weight Division at the International Boxing Tournament, held at the Royal Albert Hall” https://t.co/3yLW8yXeNJ https://t.co/ra8RtYDCHy http://twitter.com/ThisDayInWWI/status/1072689610600271873

Dec 11 1918 “The three officers who mana…

Dec 11 1918 “The three officers who managed the Australian Boxing Team in the International Boxing Tournament, held at the Royal Albert Hall, on 11 December 1918 to 12 December 1918, Lieutenant (Lt) Spencer Green, Captain R W Murphy, and Lt R A Roxburgh” https://t.co/GmLJSPpPzO https://t.co/f0dkAjCsAK http://twitter.com/ThisDayInWWI/status/1072689424654204929

Dec 11 1918 “Informal portrait of 3002 C…

Dec 11 1918 “Informal portrait of 3002 Corporal R G Stephenson DCM, who represented Australia in the Heavyweight Division of the International Boxing Tournament, held at the Royal Albert Hall” https://t.co/1RfDnMDoIm https://t.co/zmncSFHNUV http://twitter.com/ThisDayInWWI/status/1072689215392014336

Dec 11 1918 Numéro d’inventaire A 15 258 Opéra…

Dec 11 1918
Numéro d’inventaire
A 15 258
Opérateur
Georges Chevalier
Légende d’origine
Lorraine France, Metz, La Statue de Guillaume 1er déboulonnée, Vue de plus loin
Légende
Lieu ancien
Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France https://t.co/xaxWf7Jlwg http://twitter.com/ThisDayInWWI/status/1072683165158793216

                                   “The job is…

                                   “The job is
done and now for us, the USA is the dope“

“Tuesday December 10 1918 – We have pretty good sleeping
quarters now and no more night work, which is mighty good to all the boys
knowing that we can go to bed and get full nights sleep. What we are most
anxious for at present is the order to pull for the shore. The job is
done and now for us, the USA is the dope.  We hear all kinds of rumors but
nothing that one can put any faith in. It’s just a matter
of time and it seems mighty long.”

American truck driver in France – The letters of Laurance Bucknam
– Photo: 1918, France, seemingly pensive American ambulance & truck drivers. Tennessee State Library & Archives

“We moved from Briey to Trier. This part of Ge…

“We moved from Briey to Trier. This
part of Germany is a strange contrast to the France from which we come. The
food is plentiful, the farms are wells stocked, the roads are good. In fact,
Germany today has no aspect of a nation who has been at war for over four years.
The people are friendly and several times on the road, I have stopped and had
dinner with some kind German family. Even the peasants have a sort of education,
most of them speaking two or three languages. They are ambiguous people,
leading equally a life at home of peace and culture, and a military life of war
and kultur.”

December 1918, American ambulance driver in Germany – Diary of Allison
LePontois – Crile Archive Center for History Education – Photo: December 1918, American soldiers at the Porta Nigra (Roman city gate) Trier
Germany.

                                            “N…

                                            “Nice,
France, a trip long to be remembered”

“Seven days permission with nothing to do was like heaven! Nice is a beautiful
place, full of flowers and the air full of perfume, the weather
warm and mild and many
congenial friends. I visited Monte Carlo and Monaco, but did not stay. Army
officers are not allowed to play at Monte Carlo at the present.”

1918, American soldier’s letter home – Pacific Service Magazine Volume (June 1918-May 1919) Volume
10
– Photo: 1918, two American
soldiers and a French friend in Nice, France – A grainy photo, but it still captures
the softness in the air, and the lady’s awesome pom-pom hat! The W&M Digital Archive

Mannerheim Made Regent of Finland

Mannerheim (seated) while Regent of Finland.

December 11 1918, Helsinki–After the Whites’ victory in the Finnish Civil War, they decided to make Finland a kingdom.  In a feat of spectacularly bad timing, in October they invited Prince Frederick Charles of Hesse, husband of the Kaiser’s youngest sister, to serve as King of Finland.  Germany’s defeat and the fall of the Kaiser made this arrangement untenable, and in December Frederick Charles renounced the throne without ever having set foot in the country.  Finland was now a kingdom without a king, and its parliament decided to declare Mannerheim, hero of the Civil War, as Regent of Finland, on December 11.  Mannerheim had left Finland after his victory in the Civil War, not wanting to associate further with the Germans whose intervention he had opposed (though they had been instrumental in the Whites’ victory).  Mannerheim was popular among the Whites and, perhaps more importantly, with the Allies, and was able to secure substantial food aid for Finland, often called “Mannerheim bread” in his honor.

In 1919, Finland decided to become a republic, and Mannerheim stepped down as Regent.  He ran for President of Finland, lost, and largely remained out of politics until the 1930′s.

Thats a lot or machine guns. And an American …

Thats a lot or machine guns.
And an American division was about twice the size of a British one, hence the more than double amount of guns.