Category: ww1 american soldiers

June 1918, France – “Everywhere the Amer…

June 1918, France – “Everywhere the American soldiers are stationed they make
friends with the children immediately. And the children, once the ice broken, are not backward. They see in these soldiers their
friends, their deliverers.”

The Literary Digest, Vol. 58 – Photo: 1918, in a village of Lorraine, American soldiers sharing their lunch with little French rascals. – Tourisme Lorraine France

‘Clothing generally for the American troops in…

‘Clothing generally for the American troops in France was
repaired by seamstresses in the small towns and communes.
Each town had a forewoman who distributed the damaged
clothing, after it had been disinfected and laundered, and kept all counts.
There were 880 of these home workers, nearly all of them from needy families. The best record for darning socks was made by an old French
grandma in her 80’s!’

America’s Munitions 1917-1918 – Photo: 1918, village in the Meuse, France, American soldiers keeping company to French
seamstresses at work. US National Archives

“Yes, we see the Americans. They are handsome….

“Yes, we see the Americans. They are handsome.
Their faces are just the type we imagined, clean-cut with sharp
outlines. Many of them are blond, of light hair and complexion. The cord
encircling the backs of their heads which secures their slouch hats surprises
us. They smile at the children; they pick them up and carry them in their
muscular arms. It is curious what a strong calm air they have.”

WW1, talking about the American soldiers in France, the French Trench Publication “Le Diable au Cor” – Photo :
WW1, Meuse, France, American soldier surrounded by the children of the village. La Contemporaine.

                                              …

                                                                    Cousins

“I have always hoped and expected that the
Marines would do their share and when the French
say that we fight like our ‘Canadian Cousins’ it is praise of the highest sort.
In other words a Marine is ace-high around here!”

June 1918, a US Marine writing to his mom about this experience in the Belleau Wood Battle. Dear Folks At Home

Photo: A US soldier meets a Canadian Hightlander. Note: The Canadian Highlander regiments were in the United States in July of 1917 for
“British Recruiting Week” which encouraged enlistment in WW1. See photo of Canadian Highlanders in NYC @ the

US WWI
Centennial Commission’s Instagram and on YouTube.

“Dinky is a cat made of vel…

“Dinky is a cat made of velvet. He’s entirely flat except his
head, which is becomingly round with yellow glass eyes. I carry Dinky inside my jacket always and feel safer with him there. He hangs at the head of my bed now
and I feel better with him there.”

WW1, France,

“A Yankee in the Trenches

– Photo: 1918, Argonne, France, a “Yankee” artillery sleeping with his kitty in a dugout. US National Archives

“Our food is very simple, mos…

“Our food is very simple, mostly rye bread, coffee and meat, but we have plenty and are very
well satisfied!”

“Embedded journalist” and
volunteer infantryman with the Rainbow division during World War I – Somewhere Over There: The Letters, Diary, and Artwork of a
World War I Corporal –
– Photo: WW1, Meuse, France, American soldiers enjoying their meal. La Contemporaine.

                                  “DO NOT GO O…

                                  “DO NOT GO OUT THERE… WITHOUT YOUR MASK

“Of
course, we always wore a helmet and carried our gas mask! When
in a forward position no sensible man ever permits himself to be separated from
his mask. We made it a practice not to go even from one room of the house to
another without taking our masks along and placing them in a convenient position where they could be slipped on at a
moment’s notice.”

June 1918, American doctor in France – The Boston Medical
and Surgical Journal
– Photo: famous photo taken 100 years ago today, in Saint Sauflieu, Somme, France.

                       “Pack Up Your Tro…

                       “Pack Up Your Troubles in Your
Old Kit-Bag, and Smile, Smile, Smile”

Pack Up Your
Troubles in Your Old Kit-Bag
, WW1 marching song  – Photo: WW1 soldiers’
beautiful smile – American Experience PBS awesome “The Great WarAirs June 19, 2018​

                                          ‘Ma…

                                         
‘May 28, 1918 was the US military’s
coming-of-age’

”Historically,
the fight for Cantigny was the first American clash with the German Army, a conflict between two world powers that would see many
bloodier fights over the next twenty-seven years. Tactically, the operation
previewed modern 
military methods, marking the first time American soldiers fought with the
intricate support of artillery, machine guns, flamethrowers, grenades, gas,
tanks, and airplanes, signifying the establishment of combined arms
and the birth of our modern Army. Thus, May 28, 1918 was the US military’s
coming-of-age—the day it crossed a historical no-man’s-land that separated
contemporary fighting methods from the muskets and cannon of the nineteenth
century.”

First Over
There: The Attack on Cantigny, America’s First Battle of World War I

Photo: Behind a
rolling barrage supplied by the French, the men of the 28th Infantry regiment,
supported by the 15th Infantry regiment, took the village of Cantigny from the
18th German Army in the early morning hours of May 28th and held it against
three days of German counterattacks.  Casualties were about 1600 on each
side, with the Americans taking 250 prisoners – La contemporaine

                                              …

                                                                 Run To Remember

‘Memorial Day 1918 – The uniforms we wear, and the
losses we have already sustained make us appreciate the significance of
Memorial Day. It was easy to select speakers from our various
commands to address meetings of soldiers in every village they were quartered.
The regimental bands were sent by trucks from one station to another, so that
all of our soldiers should have the benefit of their services.

The main celebration took place
in Baccarat where our Headquarters are located. The dead of
our Division, in this Sector since the beginning of March, are
buried in the Baccarat Military Cemetery;
and our first duty was to pay them
solemn honors. Everybody of all ranks was present at the ceremony, together
with large number of the civilian population. Children of the town placed wreaths
on the graves of our dead, and the last resting place of our French companions
was not neglected.’

Later,
the men attended a YMCA-sponsored Memorial Day program in Baccarat.

Father
Duffy’s Story: A Tale of Humor and Heroism, of Life and Death with the Fighting Sixty-Ninth
Photo: 1918 Memorial Day celebration in Baccarat, France – May 30, 1918. American soldiers, winning a 100-yard dash. The State Historical Society of
Missouri