Category: Western Front

Cheerful French gunners by their 90 mm artil…

Cheerful French gunners by their 90 mm artillery gun near Martigny (Meurthe-et-Moselle), 18 November 1916.

A French soldier displaying a regulation inf…

A French soldier displaying a regulation infantry dress at the Army Clothing Department at Vanves, 28 December 1916.

The moustache isn’t regulation but definitely encouraged.

An aerial oblique view of the messenger dog …

An aerial oblique view of the messenger dog kennels of the French Sixth Army at Gournay, 20 September 1915.

French infantry manning a forward line of tr…

French infantry manning a forward line of trenches in Lorraine, January 1915.

One of the lessons learnt in 1915 and 1916 was that holding forward trenches like this. Packing the firing trench with men was a sure way to get men killed during the artillery barrage that preceded an attack. Doctrine took time to catch up to the reality of war and none of the armies on the Western Front in 1915 knew what would work.
Some German generals would continue to attempt to hold the front line in strength well into 1917, despite official orders stating otherwise. Goes to show that personal tendencies of local commanders sometimes mattered more than doctrine.

A French war dog wearing a gas mask and anti…

A French war dog wearing a gas mask and anti-gas goggles at the military kennels at Roesbrugge, 16 May 1916.

Men of the French aeronautical service holding…

Men of the French aeronautical service holding message balloons 10 April 1917. These balloons were sent out when the wind favoured with messages of hope and encouragement to the French population behind German lines.

Exchanging addresses during the relief. 1/6t…

Exchanging addresses during the relief. 1/6th North Staffs and 50th French Infantry, Neuville St Vaast, February 1916.

French soldier wearing gas mask, Neuville St…

French soldier wearing gas mask, Neuville St Vaast, January 1916.

Wagon which carried fighting rations for offic…

Wagon which carried fighting rations for officers and men of the Scots Guards, date unknown.

Sign on the side of the wagon says ‘Guards Club – No Drinks After 10PM.’

Battle traffic seen at Grevillers on 25 Augu…

Battle traffic seen at Grevillers on 25 August 1918, following the village’s capture by the British 37th Division and the New Zealand Division at the start of the Hundred Days Offensive, a few days earlier. Mark V tanks of the 10th Battalion the Tank Corps and British and New Zealand infantry going forward. Also seen are captured German 4.2 inch guns.