Category: tuesdaythoughts

                                   You cannot …

                                   You cannot vote unless you register

You
have no right to be a slacker as a citizen, you have no right not to take an
active part in what is happening to your country”

Minnie
Fisher Cunningham
, one of the leaders of the
suffrage movement in Texas, fought with many women and a few men to
ensure that Texan women could have a say in their government. Her tenacity paid off as Texas
opened up primary voting to women in 1918.

Women Voted in Texas in 1918 – from the Minnie Fisher Cunningham Papers”

“Tuesday September 17 1918.  I took in four ma…

“Tuesday September 17 1918.  I took in four malades at Ferme Montecouve and l’aumonier
and four brancardiers to
Vezaponin. No shelling —
thank heaven.

Packed
up immediately – Had lunch &
left for our old camp ground near Morsain. Slept in cars which are filled with
baggage.

God!
I never want to go thru such Hell again!”

American ambulance driver’s in the Aisne sector, France. See Google
map
Diaries of Samuel Keplinger – Photo: 1918, Aisne sector, American ambulance
drivers and a French Aumonier. Missouri Digital Heritage

“Every French regiment has a regimental tailor…

“Every French regiment has
a regimental tailor shop and supply of uniforms in the village where they go to repos.
I often see their soldier tailor, a little Alsatian, sewing up the shell
rents in a comrade’s greatcoat. He sets up his shop in a pleasant spot and sews as calmly as an old lady.”

WW1 American ambulance driver in France – A Volunteer Poilu –  Photo: WW1, France, a
tailor in the trench. La Contemporaine.

‘Tuesday, September 3, 1918 – Worked li…

‘Tuesday, September 3, 1918 – Worked like a slave all day in the shop – then went
swimming in the Moselle. Afterwards I washed clothes and shaved. After supper I
wrote a letter home and read The Man in Evening Dress–a darn cheap
story. Aviators Boche kept us awake for several hours. Spent the later
evening in the cellar.’

American ambulance driver in
Lorraine, France – From the WW1 blog

Grant R. Willard, American Volunteer – Photo: WW1, Lorraine, France, auto repair shop for American and French vehicles.

“This wild pig was caught between the first an…

“This wild pig was
caught between the first and second lines of trenches.
Luckily for him, instead of the cook pot he was promoted to Divisional Mascot.”

1918, American soldier
in Cantigny, France US Doughboy

                                              …

                                                             ON LES AURA!

“Well, dear people, these are perilous and critical times, but
somehow I feel that “on les aura” will prove to be a justifiable war cry. We’ve
got to get them and anybody who doesn’t go down in the boat trying, ought to be exiled to Germany. If we survive
this year, all is well with the world and I think we shall.”

August 1918, American ambulance driver in France – Three Lying or Four Sitting – Photo: 1918, “ON LES AURA” (we will get them), a store located on rue St Lazare, Paris 9eme – In 1918, as Paris was big Bertha’s favorite target, Parisian
shopkeepers glued strips of tape on their windows to reduce the risk
of breakage in case of explosion. In the process, these shopkeepers found a way to express their creativity.  See great photos of Paris during WW1

“Ran all night last night. The greatest tempta…

“Ran
all night last night. The greatest temptation I ever had was to sneak off in
the forests of Villers & go to sleep. It is an absolute fact that I fell
asleep 8 or more times on the road. I wake up with a start — just in time to
dodge a truck! My lids can not be held open. Water, whiskey, coffee nor
anything will not keep me awake.

But
still running. Others going thru same thing.”

August 1918, American ambulance driver in the Aisne sector, France – Diaries of Samuel Keplinger – Photo: 1918, France, American ambulance driver taking a nap.

“It’s Tabaski day! Lots of lambs will be sacri…

“It’s Tabaski day! Lots of lambs will be sacrificed for Mahomet who, in
return, promised us a delicious Heaven and succulent lamb shops!”

French
writer Jean-Marc Gastellu – Photo : WW1 French Muslim soldiers
celebrating Tabaski day or Eid
al-Adha – See all the awesome photos showing the Tabaski parties in France during WW1.

‘August 20-21 1918 – Much damage last ni…

‘August 20-21 1918 – Much damage last night lots of areoplane activity –
Packed up before going on duty – Packed first aid dressing station too. Had a bath
in a bathtub filled by a spring. Had a complete change of clothing except pants
and overalls. Feeling fine!’

American ambulance driver’s diary in Cohan, Aisne sector, France – J. Reah Hollinger’s
diary – Franklin & Marshall College – Photo: August 1918, France, American’ s al fresco
bath in a bathtub! US National Archives.

“August 21 1918 – I took some pictures t…

“August 21 1918 – I took some pictures this morning. The weather
was a little cloudy but there was a good light to shoot photos. The boches
are joining us en masse and all these prisoners want only one thing: stay with
us. They all complain a lot… They tell us that it became impossible for them to
fight with an empty stomach!”

Moroccan soldier in the French army – Lettres de paix et de
guerre de Bernard Guersent
– Photo : August 21 1918,  Aisne sector, one French African soldier leading
a column of German prisoners. Note in the background, French peasants
& soldiers working in the field – La Contemporaine